Coinfection

AASLD 2014: Sofosbuvir + Simeprevir Shows Good Results in Real-World Use

Regimens containing sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) -- including sofosbuvir plus simeprevir (Olysio) -- work well for people with hepatitis C genotype 1 in real-world use, which to date has included some of the patients most urgently in need of treatment at the dawn of the interferon-free era, according to a pair of presentations at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting last week in Boston. Sofosbuvir plus ribavirin alone is highly effective for people with genotype 2.

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AASLD 2014: AbbVie 3D Regimen and Sofosbuvir/ Ribavirin Show High Cure Rates for HIV/HCV Coinfection

AbbVie's 3D regimen (paritaprevir/ombitasvir/ritonavir plus dasabuvir) with ribavirin for 12 weeks and Gilead Science's sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus ribavirin for 24 weeks both produced good sustained virological response rates for most patients with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, according to studies presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting last week in Boston.

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IDWeek 2014: Study Shows HIV/HCV Coinfected Women Have Lower Bone Density

ART-treated women with HIV/HCV coinfection have greater deficits in some structural bone parameters compared to women with HIV only, HCV only, or neither virus, according to the results of a cross-sectional study presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. Among women with HCV, bone loss was most profound in those with stage 3-4 liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, which adversely effects bone health.

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AASLD 2014: HIV Positive People Have High Survival Rates After Liver Transplants Due to HCC

People with HIV -- most of whom were coinfected with hepatitis B or C -- generally had good outcomes after liver transplantation due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with 5-year survival rates similar to those of HIV negative transplant recipients and better than those of people who underwent other types of liver cancer treatment, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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IDWeek 2014: HIV/HCV Coinfected People Do Not Have Poorer CD4 Cell Recovery

Among HIV positive people on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection was not associated with significantly lower CD4 T-cell or B-cell gains, according to study findings presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia.alt

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AASLD 2014: Sustained Response to HCV Treatment Reduces Mortality, Liver Cancer, Liver Transplants

People who achieve sustained virological response (SVR) when treated with interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C have a lower risk of death, are less likely to develop liver cancer, and need fewer liver transplants than those who were treated but not cured, according to results from a meta-analysis of more than 34,000 patients presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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Coverage of IDWeek 2014

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2014, October 8-12, in Philadelphia.

Conference highlights include the HIV cascade of care, experimental antiretroviral therapies, interferon-free hepatitis C treatment, and news about other infectious diseases including Ebola virus and enterovirus D68.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek 2014 website

10/17/14

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AASLD 2014: Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir Cures Nearly All Genotype 1 HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

All but 1 participant treated with a coformulation of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir (Harvoni) achieved sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment in a study looking at traditionally hard-to-treat HIV/HCV coinfected patients, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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HCV Sexual Transmission: HIV Negative May Be at Risk, More Awareness and Testing Needed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be sexually transmitted among HIV positive men who have sex with men, but HIV negative men may be at risk as well, according to recent reports. Other recent studies have looked at awareness of HCV sexual transmission and screening practices, suggesting that improvement is needed in both areas.

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