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Kaiser Study Shows No Elevated Heart Attack Risk for People with HIV

A previously reported increase in the risk of myocardial infarction or heart attack among people living with HIV has been reversed in recent years, according to an analysis of nearly 25,000 Kaiser Permanent members published in the January 18 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. In 2010-2011, HIV positive patients were at no greater risk than HIV negative people.

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Low CD4 Count, Suboptimal HIV Treatment Linked to Higher Anal Cancer Risk

People with HIV who experienced extensive immune deficiency or who used early antiretroviral drugs before the advent of combination highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid-90s may be at greater risk for developing anal cancer, according to a retrospective analysis published in the January 28 edition of AIDS.

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ICAAC 2014: New Drug Isavuconazole Is Effective Against Opportunistic Fungal Infections

A new antifungal drug, isavuconazole, matched the efficacy of voriconazole for treatment of invasive fungal infections in cancer patients with compromised immunity, but with fewer side effects, researchers reported at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy last week in Washington, DC.Isavuconazole was shown to be effective against various fungal infections that act as opportunistic illnesses in people with HIV/AIDS, including Aspergillus, Candida, and Cryptococcus.

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People with HIV May Experience Low- and High-Frequency Hearing Loss

People living with HIV were found to have impairment in both low-frequency and high-frequency hearing, but no association was seen with disease variables such as CD4 T-cell count or type of antiretroviral treatment, according to a recently published study.

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AIDS 2014: COPD Is Common Among People with HIV Even At High CD4 Counts

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not uncommon among HIV positive adults with CD4 counts above 500 cells/mm3 -- that is, even fairly early in the course of infection -- according to the first findings from a pulmonary substudy of the large international Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) trial, presented At the 20th International AIDS Conference last month in Melbourne. Among the nearly 1000 participants with good quality spirometry (pulmonary function) tests, the overall COPD prevalence was 6.8%, but there was considerable variation across regions.

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IDWeek 2014: Acute Retroviral Syndrome Linked to Higher HIV Levels in Blood, Gut and Brain

People with acute or very recent HIV infection who experience the flu-like symptoms of acute retroviral syndrome (ARS) have higher levels of HIV RNA and proviral DNA in their blood, colon, and brain tissue, indicating more active viral replication, as well as higher levels of certain inflammatory biomarkers researchers reported at IDWeek 2014 this month in Philadelphia.

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AIDS2014: Efavirenz Use Not Linked to Neurocognitive Impairment, Study Finds

People who use antiretroviral regimens containing efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the Atripla coformulation) were not at higher risk for impaired neurocognitive function, either overall or when looking at specific functional domain, researchers reported this week at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

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HIVMA Issues Guidelines for Managing Chronic Kidney Disease in People with HIV

The HIV Medical Association (HIVMA) of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has released updated recommendations for HIV positive people with chronic kidney disease. The guidelines, published in the September 17 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, state that antiretroviral therapy (ART) is beneficial for such patients, but they should avoid tenofovir (Viread, also in the Truvada, Atripla, Complera, and Stribild coformulations), which can cause kidney impairment.

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AIDS 2014: Weight Gain on ART May Raise Risk of Heart Disease and Diabetes

People with HIV who gain weight shortly after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, according to findings from the D:A:D study presented this week at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

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