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Hepatitis B

World Health Assembly Adopts Strategies for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and STIs

The 194 member states participating in the 69th World Health Assembly, which governs the World Health Organization (WHO) in late May unanimously approved the adoption of WHO's draft global health sector strategies for management of HIV, viral hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) through the year 2021.

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Blood Test Could Help Predict Which Hepatitis B Patients Will Develop Liver Cancer

A blood test that measures a set of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) may help identify who will develop hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a type of primary liver cancer, according to research published in the May 24 online edition of OncoTarget.

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EASL 2016: Tenofovir Alafenamide Works Well Against Hepatitis B with Less Effect on Bones and Kidneys

The new tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) pro-drug is as potent against hepatitis B virus (HBV) as the current tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) formulation, but with less detrimental effects on bone and kidney biomarkers, according to a pair of studies presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) last week in Barcelona.

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EASL 2016: Hepatitis B Treatment Linked to Colorectal and Cervical Cancer

People with hepatitis B who were treated with nucleoside/nucleotide antivirals did not have an overall higher rate of malignancies, but did show an increased incidence of colorectal and cervical cancer, underlining the need for regular screening, according to a study presented at the recent EASL International Liver Congress in Barcelona.

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Hepatitis B and C Transmission Could Be Ended in the U.S., Report Says

Hepatitis B and C could be eliminated as a public health threat in the U.S. by treating more people in order to end transmission and prevent progression of liver disease and death, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine).

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EASL 2016: Antiviral Therapy Linked to Less Liver Cancer and Death in People with Mild Hepatitis B

Treatment with nucleoside/nucleotide antiviral therapy was associated with longer overall survival and reduced risk of developing liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for hepatitis B patients with high viral load but minimal liver inflammation -- a group generally not prioritized for treatment --according to a report presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) last month in Barcelona.

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Cancer Is Falling Overall But Liver Cancer Is Rising, Largely Due to Hepatitis B and C

Overall cancer rates have declined significantly in the U.S. over the past decade thanks to better screening and prevention, with the notable exception of liver cancer, according to a new Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer. A majority of liver cancer is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), which is preventable with a vaccine, or hepatitis C virus (HCV), which can now be cured in most cases.

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EASL 2016: Core Inhibitor NVR 3-778 Plus Pegylated Interferon Inhibits Hepatitis B Activity

NVR 3-778, an experimental drug that interferes with hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid assembly, led to reductions in HBV DNA, HBV RNA, and hepatitis B "e" antigen (HBeAg), showing greater activity when combined with pegylated interferon, researchers reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) this month in Barcelona.

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CROI 2016: Injection-Related Indiana HIV Epidemic Is Under Control, But Vigilance Needed

Extensive epidemiological investigation followed by prevention and treatment interventions have largely succeeded in controlling an outbreak of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in rural Indiana linked to injection of prescription opioids, but new cases continue to appear and many other communities may be at risk for similar outbreaks, according to presentations at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) last week in Boston.

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