Back HCV Prevention

HCV Prevention

EASL 2016: High Incidence of HCV Reinfection Among HIV+ Gay Men in Western Europe

There is a very high incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in western Europe, according to research presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) this week in Barcelona.  Investigators found that a quarter of HIV-positive gay men who cleared an initial HCV infection were reinfected within 3 years. The researchers believe that current prevention strategies are failing, and called for intensive monitoring of people who have apparently cleared HCV infection.

alt

Read more:

U.S. Government Releases New Guidance for Syringe Program Funding

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has released new guidance regarding use of federal funds to pay for many aspects of syringe service programs aimed at reducing the risk of HIV and viral hepatitis transmission among people who inject drugs. The guidance follows a change in federal law that lifts the overall ban on syringe service funding, although the new rules do not allow programs to pay for needles or syringes themselves.

alt

Read more:

Coverage of the 2015 International Harm Reduction Conference

Coverage of the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference, October 18-22, 2015, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

Conference highlights include needle exchange and opioid substitution therapy, programs for people who inject drugs, and international drug policy reform.

Full listing of coverage

IHRC 2015 website

10/21/15

 

alt

AASLD 2015: HCV Infection During Anal Sex May Happen without Blood, Study Finds

Hepatitis C virus is present in large enough quantities in the rectal fluid of men with HIV and hepatitis C coinfection to permit HCV transmission without the presence of blood, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City reported Sunday at the AASLD Liver Meeting in San Francisco.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Opioid Substitution Therapy, Especially with Needle Exchange, Reduces Hepatitis C Transmission

A pooled analysis of 25 studies has for the first time shown good evidence that methadone and other forms of opioid substitution therapy substantially reduce new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, according to a report presented today at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Previously, this had been clearly demonstrated for HIV, but not hepatitis C.alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment as Prevention Must Address Concerns of People Who Inject Drugs

While epidemiologists and public health experts are excited about the potential of new hepatitis C drugs to limit onward transmission of the virus among people who inject drugs, some strategies ignore profound barriers to drug users engaging with healthcare and their broader needs. For "treatment as prevention" to be ethical and acceptable to this people who inject drugs, enabling treatment and policy environments need to be created, according to reports at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference last month in Kuala Lumpur.

alt

Read more:

Sexual Transmission of HCV Is Increasing Among Gay and Bi Men with HIV

Sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is occurring among HIV-positive men who have sex with men, associated with receptive anal sex and non-injection drug use, and a small subset of men may be prone to recurrent infection after being cured of hepatitis C, according to a meta-analysis reported in the August 7 online edition of AIDS.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Community-based Drug Projects Provide an Alternative to Compulsory Detention in Asia

A series of pilot projects in China, Indonesia, and Cambodia are showing that non-coercive, community-based drug treatment projects are feasible and more effective than the current approach of many Asian countries, incarceration and compulsory treatment, according to findings presented at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference last month in Kuala Lumpur and in a report launched at the conference.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2015: PrEP and the Risk of Hepatitis C Virus Infection [VIDEO]

 Are gay and bisexual men who take Truvada for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) at greater risk for sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection? Experts discussed this issue and others at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Why Is Injecting Equipment Reused? Drug Users Do Their Own Research to Find Out

Even in the context of the relatively good access to harm reduction services in Australia, the principle reasons for people who inject drugs to reuse syringes relate to the convenience of services, the stigma of drug use, a fear of repercussions, and other contextual factors, according to a recent study. No participants reported sharing equipment as a choice -- if sterile equipment had been readily available at the time they needed it, they would have preferred to use it.

alt

Read more:

HIV-Negative Gay Men May Be Susceptible to Sexually Transmitted Hepatitis C

Several studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be sexually transmitted among HIV-positive men who have sex with men, but HIV-negative gay and bisexual men may be at risk as well if they share similar risk factors, according to a report in the June 2015 Journal of Viral Hepatitis.

alt

Read more:

EACS 2015: Hepatitis C Incidence Remains Stable Among HIV-Positive Gay Men in Europe

Researchers have seen no decline in new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in 16 European CASCADE cohorts, according to a poster presented at the 15th European AIDS Conference last week in Barcelona. However, trends seem to differ between various regions of Europe.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment Could Cut HCV Transmission Among UK Gay Men in Half

Access to more effective hepatitis C treatment could reduce new infections among men who have sex with men in the United Kingdom by half over the next decade, according to a mathematical modeling study presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) International Liver Congress in Vienna in April.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Needle Exchanges Must Meet Needs of People Who Inject Steroids and Image-enhancing Drugs

The numbers of people injecting steroids and other image-enhancing drugs has increased significantly in the last decade, and harm reduction services need to develop new skills if they are to help people using these drugs avoid blood-borne viruses, according to presentations at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference last week in Kuala Lumpur. Surveys in the UK suggest that rates of HIV and viral hepatitis infections are significantly higher among people using these drugs than in the general population.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2015: Reinfection after HCV Cure - Long-term Support Needed for People Who Have Injected Drugs

Reinfection rates after a hepatitis C cure among people who inject drugs, as well as past drug users, are relatively low, according to findings from studies from Norway and Canada presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress in Vienna in April. The findings suggest that current and former injection drug users who have been cured of hepatitis C require ongoing support to remain free of HCV, but also indicate that fears of a high rate of reinfection should not be used as a reason to withhold hepatitis C treatment from people who inject drugs.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Harm Reduction Conference Calls for Political Leadership to Reform Drug Policy

The biggest challenges to harm reduction are drug policy and drug laws, Malaysian harm reduction leader Adeeba Kamarulzaman told participants at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference in Kuala Lumpur last week. Numerous speakers said that punitive and prohibitionist drug policies have restricted access to harm reduction services, contributed to the spread of HIV and hepatitis C, led to unnecessary drug overdoses, encouraged discrimination against drug users, diminished respect for human rights, encouraged the use of compulsory treatment, and resulted in the mass incarceration of people who use drugs.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2015: Civacir Immune Globulin May Help Prevent HCV Reinfection after Liver Transplant

Civacir, a hepatitis C immune globulin or antibody product, reduced the likelihood of hepatitis C virus infecting the new liver graft after transplantation in patients who were receiving but had not yet completed antiviral treatment, according to preliminary study findings presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Peer Workers Improve Drug Users' Engagement with HIV Care in Ukraine

An innovative program in which peer outreach workers use a case management approach to help HIV-positive people who inject drugs to engage with medical services and to begin antiretroviral therapy (ART) appears to be paying off, according to early results presented at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference this week in Kuala Lumpur.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2015: HCV Sexual Transmission Linked to Anal Sex, Drug Use, Lower CD4 Count

In addition to the usual risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) sexual transmission seen in most previous studies -- such as anal sex and having other sexually transmitted infections -- researchers in the Netherlands also saw an association with nasal and injection drug use and lower CD4 T-cell count, they reported in a poster presentation at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

alt

Read more:

IHRC 2015: Retreat of International Donors, National Government Neglect Threaten Harm Reduction Services

The availability of needle and syringe programs, opioid substitution therapy, and other harm reduction services for people who inject drugs is getting even worse in many parts of the world, due to shifting priorities among international donors and a refusal by many national governments to adequately respond to the health needs of their citizens who use drugs, according to delegates at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference, being held this week in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. UNAIDS estimate that US$2.3 billion is needed each year for a core package of HIV prevention, treatment, and care for people who inject drugs -- but just 7% of this is currently provided.

alt

Read more:

Clinicians Report 2 Acute HCV Infections in Kaiser PrEP Program

Two HIV negative men gay receiving HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco were newly infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), with sex being their only apparent risk factor, Kaiser clinicians reported in the February 18 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

alt

Read more: