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HCV Policy & Advocacy

Hepatitis C Treatment Guidelines Add Section on Cost-Effectiveness

HCVguidelines.org, a regularly updated website providing U.S. guidelines for testing, managing, and treating people with hepatitis C, has revised several sections and added a new section looking at the cost-effectiveness of treatment using new interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens.

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EASL 2015: Survey Shows Half of People with Hepatitis B or C Experience Discrimination

A majority of people with hepatitis B or C tell family, friends, and sometimes work colleagues about their infection, but this often leads to discrimination including avoiding physical contact, not being invited to social events, and even loss of employment, according to study of American and European patients presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

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EASL 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment May Be Highly Cost-effective for Prisoners in England

Reducing the duration of direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C will make treatment for prisoners in England highly cost-effective, and could provide an important opportunity for providing access to hepatitis C treatment for people who inject drugs, Natasha Martin from the University of California San Diego reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

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DDW 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment Could Yield Large Economic Benefit

Interferon-free direct-acting antiviral therapy that cures most people with chronic hepatitis C could lead to major economic benefits by reducing lost worker productivity, according to an analysis presented at Digestive Disease Week 2015, now underway in Washington, DC.

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Obama Budget Boosts U.S. HIV and Hepatitis Funding, Cuts Global AIDS and TB

President Obama's proposed $4 trillion budget for fiscal year 2016 would increase funding for CDC's viral hepatitis and HIV prevention efforts, boost spending for HIV research, and allocate more to combat antibiotic resistance. The proposal would also change the law to allow Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices, which could potentially save billions of dollars. But the plan would cut overall global health funding, including support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis. 

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