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Liver Cirrhosis Is More Common in U.S. than Previously Believed

New estimates indicate that more than 600,000 people in the U.S. have liver cirrhosis -- about 200,000 more than previously thought -- according to a study published online in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. Cirrhosis was associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, heavy alcohol use, and diabetes.

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10. Hepatitis C Cures for HIV/HCV Coinfected and Advanced Liver Disease

New interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens have high cure rates for chronic hepatitis C patients who were previously considered "difficult to treat," including HIV/HCV coinfected people and patients with liver cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, and liver transplant recipients. New treatment can now cure a majority of people even with multiple negative predictive factors.

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AASLD 2014: Many Hepatitis C Patients with Cirrhosis or Advanced Fibrosis Face Liver Failure

Nearly one-third of chronic hepatitis C patients with liver cirrhosis and 12% with advanced fibrosis progressed to decompensation within 5 years, and 23% and 11%, respectively, died, according to a study presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meetinglast month in Boston. These findings underscore the urgent need for treatment for such individuals.

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Cured Hepatitis C Patients May Have Same Life Expectancy as General Population

Chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced liver fibrosis or cirrhosis who achieve sustained virological response to treatment have a life expectancy matching that of the general population, according to findings from a retrospective study published in the November 12 Journal of the American Medical Association. Those who were not cured, however, had significantly reduced survival.

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Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

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